According to international law, States have the principal responsibility ‘to ensure the direct provision of the right to education in most circumstances.  Although private education is allowed under international law, there are specific conditions and limitations under which private education must operate.  While empirical data about the effectiveness of public and private schools is needed to inform the debate on how to achieve quality education, there also needs to be criteria to assess the measures for determining ‘effectiveness’ and to define what models of private education are acceptable.

This paper identifies a set of criteria for assessing the conditions and limitations of private education drawing from human rights standards applicable to African States.  It explore criteria that examine the central role of the State, universal free primary education, progressively available secondary and higher education, the aims of education, non-discrimination, and regulation of private education providers.  An examination of these standards will provide an initial set of criteria for assessing the role of private education in Africa and a basis for further research.

 

This document considers the State's obligations, and how they translate in the context of economic, social and cultural Rights, including the right to education (derived from the four key principles of equality and non-discrimination; indivisibility and interdependence of rights; accountability; and participation); Responsibilities of Non-State Actors, including Companies; and, Amnesty International's Human Rights Principles Concerning Delivery of Essential Services.

 

This report is concerned with the growing tendency amongst governments internationally to introduce forms of privatisation into public education and to move to privatise sections of public education. It identifies a set of global trends in the privatisation of education and details the variety of forms that privatisation in and of education takes; connects these forms of privatisation to particular contexts; considers some of the impacts and consequences of these privatising tendencies for the work of teachers and students' experiences of school; and explores some of the mechanisms and interests that are driving these changes.

 

This article discusses the privatisation of education from a human rights perspective. It focuses on what international human rights law in general, and the right to education in particular has to say with respect to the operation and consequences of privatisation in the area of education. The article reviews the content of the right to education and makes observations on the relationship between privatisation and violations of obligations resulting from the right to education. It provides a definition of the privatisation of education and an analysis of potential human rights issues.

This policy brief looks at the role of Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) in education from a human rights perspective, whereby the private and public sectors have distinct (although admittedly compatible) responsibilities. Using the 4-A approach to the right to education (availability, accessibility, acceptability and adaptability) it analyses the consequences of using PPP for education delivery (focusing on quality, accountability and discrimination issues) and advocates for a clearer rights-based approach to the issue.

This article explores the increasing privatisation of education. It examines various criticisms of the private provision of education and claims that privatisation is driven by an ideological agenda which is generally uncaring about any notion of the “public good” purposes of education — that is, of its role in producing social cohesion through the provision of education that is of high quality for all members of society.

On 12 June 2014, during the June Session of the Human Rights Council, the Portuguese Mission, together with Privatisation in Education Research Initiative (PERI) and the Global Initiative for Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (GI-ESCR), convened a side-event on privatisation and its impact on the right to education at Palais des Nations in Geneva. In its presentation, Antoni Verger (senior researcher and lecturer at the Department of Sociology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona) gives an overview of the global trends, multiple manifestations and common concerns.

On 12 June 2014, during the June Session of the Human Rights Council, the Portuguese Mission, together with Privatisation in Education Research Initiative (PERI) and the Global Initiative for Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (GI-ESCR), convened a side-event on privatisation and its impact on the right to education at Palais des Nations in Geneva. In this podcast, Iracema Nascimento dos Santos, from the Brazilian Campaign for the Right to Education shares the Brazilian case.

On 12 June 2014, during the June Session of the Human Rights Council, the Portuguese Mission, together with Privatisation in Education Research Initiative (PERI) and the Global Initiative for Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (GI-ESCR), convened a side-event on privatisation and its impact on the right to education at Palais des Nations in Geneva. In this podcast, Sylvain Aubry, human rights consultant, shares his research on the impact of privatisation in education on the right to education in Morocco.

On 12 June 2014, during the June Session of the Human Rights Council, the Portuguese Mission, together with Privatisation in Education Research Initiative (PERI) and the Global Initiative for Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (GI-ESCR), convened a side-event on privatisation and its impact on the right to education at Palais des Nations in Geneva. In this podcast, Anjela Taneja, from the Global Campaign for Education, shares the Indian case.

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