Since the beginnings of 2012, at least 70 teachers and over 100 students have been killed or wounded in northern Nigeria. Educational facilities have been burned, thousands of children forced out of schools and teachers made to flee for safety. The purpose of this briefing is to draw attention to the damaging effects of this on-going violence. It calls on the Islamist armed group Boko Haram and other gunmen to immediately cease all attacks on schools; and on the Nigerian authorities to provide better protection for schools and ensure that attacks are properly investigated.

This case study focuses on two factors that affect displaced children’s ability to exercise their right to education: poverty and discrimination.

Brief about education and disability in Burundi in post-conflict recovery.

On March 2014, the UN Security Council held an Open Debate on Children and Armed Conflict and unanimously adopted this resolution setting out practical steps to combat violations against children in armed conflict, including their right to education. An important element in this resolution is the reference to the use of schools by armed forces.

The report examines the different types of attacks on schools, what motivates attacks and their impact on children. Country case studies are included, looking at attacks on education in Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Mali, occupied Palestinian territory and Israel, Pakistan and Syria.

Only very low levels of humanitarian funding are provided for education. This prevents the education sector from responding swiftly to needs after periods of intense conflict – including responding to the effects of attacks on education and restoring schooling.

This report sets out how education can be better protected from attacks and how the international community can support ways of restoring education when it has been affected by conflict. It makes recommendations to governments, the UN, and humanitarian donors and agencies.

 

The purpose of the INEE Reference Guide on External Education Financing is to enable national decision-makers in low-income countries, including those in fragile situations, to better understand the ways in which donors provide education assistance, how various funding mechanisms work and why donors choose one funding mechanism over another to support education. In addition, it is hoped that this publication will help increase education policy-makers’ awareness of the types of external assistance used to fill gaps in domestic education funding at the field level.

This paper argues that education for internally displaced persons is essential, both as a human right enshrined in international law and as a component of the peace-building process.

This module was developed by RTE with the Education Cluster Working Group (ECWG) and an advisory committee of experts for direct input into the module. It is aimed at practitioners who work on education in emergencies. The module seeks to create awareness of the human rights framework as a tool for achieving quality education. With presentations, hand-outs, interactive dialogue and exercises, it guides participants to identify duty-bearers, actions to support rights-holders, and lines of accountability available to affected populations and education actors.

In addition to this overview, the module includes a PowerPoint Presentation and three hand-outs (Hand-out 1, Hand-out 2 and Hand-out 3)

This module was developed by RTE with the Education Cluster Working Group (ECWG) and an advisory committee of experts for direct input into the module. It is aimed at practitioners who work on education in emergencies. The module seeks to create awareness of the human rights framework as a tool for achieving quality education. With presentations, hand-outs, interactive dialogue and exercises, it guides participants to identify duty-bearers, actions to support rights-holders, and lines of accountability available to affected populations and education actors.

In addition to this PowerPoint Presentation, the module includes an overview  and three hand-outs (Hand-out 1, Hand-out 2 and Hand-out 3)

This module was developed by RTE with the Education Cluster Working Group (ECWG) and an advisory committee of experts for direct input into the module. It is aimed at practitioners who work on education in emergencies. The module seeks to create awareness of the human rights framework as a tool for achieving quality education. With presentations, hand-outs, interactive dialogue and exercises, it guides participants to identify duty-bearers, actions to support rights-holders, and lines of accountability available to affected populations and education actors.

The module includes an overview, a PowerPoint Presentation and three hand-outs ( Hand-out 1, Hand-out 2 and Hand-out 3).

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