This online library provides resources from the Right to Education Project as well as from other partner organisations. You can filter relevant resources by topic, region, country, content type and language. Note that resources in other languages will be available soon.

See also our list of useful databases for information on the implementation of the right to education at national level.

When governments met at the United Nationsin January 2014 to debate aspects of the sustainable development agenda to replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in 2015, over 300 civil society organizations from all parts of the world - including the Right to Educatin Project - have come together to demand human rights be integrated into every aspect of the new framework.

Published on International Human Rights Day, the joint statement "Human Rights for All Post-2015" was presented to the Open Working Group (OWG) on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at its 6th session. It sets out 10 practical, baseline implications of embedding existing human rights standards into the core of the sustainable development agenda.

This workshop had 4 objectives:

  • Highlight the issue of the right to education of children and young people deprived of their liberty
  • Bring about better coordination between all stakeholders involved in this sector.
  • Examine the practical contingencies to be addressed in view of promoting quality basic education to all minors deprived of their liberty in Africa, and outline which actors could take part in the conception and implementation of the proposed actions.
  • Examine how to contribute to coordinating and enhancing the relationship between African organisations and their governments to progressively improve access to basic education in detention environments, taking stock of relevant experiences existing on other continents.

The report presents the conclusions and recommendations of the workshop as well as practical resolutions.

These conclusions and strategy for action present:

  • Preconditions for education of minors in prisons, including legal framework and regulations
  • Educational programmes for minors: objectives, content and implementation
  • Common Strategy for an efficient action in favour of education of minors in prisons in Africa

This General Comment 5 of the Committee on the Rights of the Child interprets the Convention on the Rights of the Child as regards the treatment of unaccompanied and separated children outside their country of origin. Paragraphs 41 to 43 and 63 and 90 refers to the right to education.

Domestic work is an important occupation for millions of individuals. Women make up the overwhelming majority of these workers.

Noting the omission of express references to either domestic work or domestic workers in a broad range of national and international frameworks of law, the Committee
on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families issued a general comment in order to provide States with guidance on how to implement
their obligations under the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and the Members of Their Families.

Paragraphs 14, 57 and 59 refer to the right to education.

This General Comment 2 of the Committee on Migrants Workers interprets the Convention on the Protection of all Migrant Workers and Members of their Families as regards the rights of migrants workwers in an irregular situation and members of their families. Paragraphs 75 to 79 refer to the right to education.

The Kampala Convention is the first international treaty, adopted at regional level (Africa), that protect internally displaced persons. It binds governments to provide legal protection for the rights and well-being of those forced to flee inside their home countries due to conflict, violence, natural disasters, and other human rights abuses. Article 9.2 (b) refers to education.

This article makes some general observations on the concept of a core content of economic, social and cultural rights, and illustrate these observations by identifying some elements of the core content of the right to education using the 4 As framework (availability, accessibility, acceptability and adaptability).

This article identifies different types of State's failures to realise the right to education, which are violations of the right to education.

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