This online library provides resources from the Right to Education Project as well as from other partner organisations. You can filter relevant resources by topic, region, country, content type and language. Note that resources in other languages will be available soon.

See also our list of useful databases for information on the implementation of the right to education at national level.

This report offers findings, analysis and recommendations to end child marriage, including through education.

This Guide is intended to be a comprehensive resource for finding out more about the Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child and the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child. It provides practical information for organisations wishing to engage with the Committee but also relevant background information to ensure that this engagement is put into context. As such it is designed to be used by organisations who already use and know the Charter but want specific information about how to engage with the Committee by, for example, finding out about the procedure for submitting a communication; it can also be used by organisations new to the Charter and the Committee who are interested in reading about its history and background.

The Guide is split into six Parts:

• Part One is an introduction to the Guide.
• Part Two gives an overview of the history and content of the ACRWC and looks at how it relates to the CRC. It also considers the Committee’s mandate, its members and its achievements so far.
• Part Three is the most practical section and examines how civil society can access and use the Committee to advance children’s rights in Africa.
• Part Four looks at how the Committee fits into the structures of the African Union (AU).
• Part Five provides sources of further information.
• Part Six consists of nine annexes including a ratification table for the Children’s Charter, biographies of current Committee members, the full text of the Charter and six of the Committee’s working documents.

The aim of this manual is to provide an easily-referenced, one-stop guide to rights-based education by explaining international human rights documents while drawing on numerous country-specific examples. It presents the key human rights as they relate to children, parents and governments, and the corresponding obligations, especially of governments, that must be met to fulfil those rights, while summarising and analysing the major human rights treaties and conventions from the perspective of education. Chapters include "Integrating Human Rights in Education: What and How", "Making Education Available", "Making Education Accessible", "Making Education Acceptable", "Making Education Adaptable", "Key Issue on the Micro Level", "Human Rights Questions on the Macro Level", "Looking Ahead", and "Bibliography". The manual is intended as a reference tool for policy-makers and practitioners in education.

 

A primary objective of this report is to provide an overview of and compare the monitoring mechanisms of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the recent UN Universal Periodic Review (UPR) from a child rights perspective and how CSOs can best use these mechanisms. This is reflected in Part 1 of the report.


A secondary objective is to provide an overview of the regional human rights/ child rights mechanisms and how Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) can use them for advancing Children’s Rights. Part 2 presents such an overview.


The report offers conclusions on the Child Rights impact of the CRC mechanisms, the UPR and the regional mechanisms.

The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) provides a new and exciting opportunity for advocates to hold the United States government accountable to all its human rights obligations and commitments. This toolkit is meant to help human rights advocates engage with the UPR process, especially advocates interested in human rights in the United States and the U.S. government's participation in the UPR. The manual contains two main sections. The first section presents the steps involved before and after the UPR. The second section points out entry points for non-governmental organisations (NGOs): engage in consultation with government; submit a stakeholder report; lobby other countries; attend the UPR Working Group session; participate in the Human Rights Council session; follow-up work to ensure implementation. The Appendix contains templates and samples of NGO submissions

This report is intended to help shape the debate around financing Education For All (EFA) in an increasingly resource-constrained world, and outlines various policy options and interventions which could help to scale up more ‘equitable’ models of domestic financing for EFA. The paper focuses on increasing domestic resources in low- and middle-income countries, and goes alongside recent GCE analysis of the need to increase donor financing, including recommendations for donors to scale up their financing in support of their commitments to EFA.

Drawing on a number of secondary sources, the paper synthesises the latest research and evidence around key aspects of education financing, making clear recommendations on areas for action. The research has gained greatly from work carried out within the GCE network and includes inputs both from national coalitions and international members, such as Oxfam and ActionAid. As such, contributions reflect a representative and accurate picture of current national level scenarios and of policy areas around education financing and taxation.

The report documents how child marriage prevents girls and women from participating in all spheres of life and how the practice violates their rights, including the right to education. It is based on in-depth interviews with 80 girls and women in six districts in southern and central Malawi. Interviews were also conducted with government officials, magistrates, child protection workers, police officers in charge of child protection, social welfare officers, traditional and religious leaders, health workers, teachers, legal and women’s rights experts, and representatives of nongovernmental organizations, the United Nations, and donor organizations.
 
The report describes factors contributing to child marriage, the severe consequences of child marriage, the risks that girls face when they resist these marriages, and the abuses they frequently face in marriage. It also examines the absence of protection for victims of child marriage and the many obstacles they face in attempting to obtain redress; as well as shortcomings in existing programs to combat child marriage.
 
The report reviews Malawi's laws and international obligations on child marriage as well as on the right to education and makes concrete recommendations to the Malawi government.
 

The government of Malawi should increase efforts to end widespread child and forced marriage, or risk worsening poverty, illiteracy, and preventable maternal deaths in the country.
According to government statistics, half of the girls in Malawi will be married by their 18th birthday, with some as young as age 9 or 10 being forced to marry. Malawi faces many economic challenges, but the rights of girls and women, including the right to education, should not be sacrificed as a result.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This comparative report reviews and analyses a range of selected educational issues in Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)+6 countries, which include 10 ASEAN member countries plus Australia, China, India, Japan, New Zealand, and the Republic of Korea. In particular, it highlights the key issues, challenges and opportunities for improving system performance and reducing educational disparities across ASEAN+6 countries. It thus provides useful inputs for informing policy options for education development in these and other countries. The issues reviewed are grouped into three policy areas: 1) sector policy and management frameworks, 2) secondary education, and 3) technical and vocational education and training (TVET), all of which are of critical importance in the context of formulating and operationalizing education reform agendas in these countries. The reports informs about legislative and policy frameworks. The report focuses on quality, teachers and financing.

The Regional Forum on the Protection of the Right to Education during Insecurity and Armed Conflict in the Middle East and North Africa Region was organized from 19-21 January 2014 in  Jordan as one of the main activities of a joint project between the United Nations Training and Documentation Centre for South-west Asia and the Arab Region (OHCHR-Doha Centre) and Protect Education in Insecurity and Conflict (PEIC) – a program of Education Above All Foundation.

The  report final provides information on the forum: its objectives, its findings and recommendations.

Pages